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CBC Radio's The House: A dose of reality

On this week’s show: Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland explains a new global tax deal and discusses the future of federal COVID-19 supports. Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions president Linda Silas explores the possible impact of vaccine mandates on the health care system. Plus — experts debunk the dewormer conspiracy and a former contractor for the CAF shares the story of his family’s long-awaited flight out of Afghanistan.

Global tax deal dilemma 

A new tax deal between 136 countries has been hailed as "historic" and a "landmark" agreement to tax multinational corporations.

But one provision of the agreement would force Canada to shelve its own proposed tax on digital services. Some anti-poverty campaigners are calling the new global deal "a gigantic tax break" for tech giants.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland joins The House to explain why Canada pushed for the global tax agreement.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland explains why Canada pushed for a new global tax agreement and what effect it will have here.

The nurses who haven't gotten their shots

Doctors and nurses in Quebec have another month to get their COVID-19 shots or face suspension without pay, after the province pushed back its original vaccine mandate deadline this week. Officials cited fears of a staffing crisis because thousands of health care workers remain unvaccinated or have only had a single dose.

As similar deadlines loom in other provinces, and with different mandates in place across the country, what challenges could confront health care systems across Canada? Linda Silas, president of the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions, sits down with Chris Hall to discuss.

Linda Silas, president of the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions, discusses the possible impact of looming vaccination mandates for health-care workers.

Debunking the dewormer conspiracy

A medication primarily used to treat parasites in horses has become the subject of conspiracy theories in both the United States and Canada claiming it's a cure for COVID-19.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney recently denounced publicly the use of ivermectin to treat COVID-19 and the provincial health authority released an editorial stating there is no scientific evidence supporting its use in the pandemic.

How did ivermectin gain such a following? And why has it become a symbol of the right-left divide in the United States and Canada? Journalist Kiera Butler and University of Alberta professor Tim Caulfield discuss. 

Journalist Kiera Butler and University of Alberta professor Tim Caulfield dissect false theories around ivermectin, a drug primarily used to treat parasites in animals, which has been touted without evidence as a miracle cure for COVID-19.

Flight from a fallen Afghanistan 

In August, The House spoke with a man who had worked as a contractor with the Canadian Armed Forces in Afghanistan — and was left behind as the Taliban conquered the country. 

Now, he, his wife and four children have made it to neighbouring Pakistan and will soon be arriving in Canada. He joins The House to discuss the journey out of his home country and his hopes for the future.

In August, a former contractor with the Canadian Armed Forces detailed his family’s attempts to flee Afghanistan as the country fell to the Taliban. Now safely in Pakistan, he shares their journey out of the country and his hope for the future.

Can Canada help the new Afghanistan?

Thousands of Afghans have fled their country since Kabul fell to the Taliban. Almost 40 million people remain. Jobs in government and with NGOs disappeared overnight. The country's economy is in freefall.

The House welcomes two experts in international development to talk about how Canada should funnel aid to the people of Afghanistan — and whether the best strategy will have to involve the Taliban.

Two experts in international development debate how Canada should funnel aid to the people of Afghanistan — and whether the best strategy will have to involve the Taliban.