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Great Britain

Scotland most dangerous place to work in Britain with 231 deaths in last decade The Scottish Sun

SCOTLAND is the most dangerous place to work in Britain, with 231 accidental deaths in the workplace over the past 10 years.

Analysts trawled through Health & Safety Executive data showing workplace deaths across the UK from 2009 to 2019 and found that a total of 1,540 people have died at work in the past decade.

The highest number of deaths, however, was found to be in Scotland, where 231 people have died in workplace accidents.

Those living in the North East of the country were safest, with just 39 people dying in accidents in the workplace in the past decade.

The study by Hudgell Solicitors also found that the construction industry was the most dangerous, averaging 36 deaths every year, following by agriculture, forestry and fishing, with an average of 29 deaths a year.

Manufacturing saw an average of 21 deaths a year, with 15 deaths in the transportation and storage industry on average and 10 deaths in the wholesale, retail and motor repair sector.

A total of nine people died on average each year in the waste and recycling industry and there are an average of seven deaths-a-year in the admin and support services sector.

A spokesperson for Hudgell Solicitors said: "You are more likely to die at work in Scotland than any other region in Britain.

Workplace deaths by UK region 2009-2019

1 - Scotland - 231

2 - North West - 177

3 - Yorkshire & Humber - 164

4 - South East - 148

5 - East of England - 144

6 - South West - 142

7 - West Midlands - 136

8 - Wales - 127

9 - East Midlands - 118

10 - London - 114

11 - North East - 39

"We analysed 10 years of workplace death-related data and found that workers in Scotland have suffered a total of 231 deaths since 2009, an average of around one fatality every two weeks.

"In comparison, the North East is the safest place to work in the country, with just 39 fatal workplace accidents since 2009."

He added: "Workers in construction jobs have suffered the highest number of injuries resulting in death, making it the most dangerous industry in the UK."

The study also quizzed 2,000 workers about workplace training and health and safety and found that 40 per cent didn't have a clue about health and safety procedures, with one-in-five injuring themselves at work.

A total of 25 per cent said they had not revived any on-the job safety training at all.

Jane Woodcock, Head of Personal Injury at Hudgell Solicitors, said last week: "Our research shows a worrying lack of health and safety knowledge among the UK workforce.

"It’s something that really needs to be addressed in order to prevent more fatal accidents in the future.

"A lot of the time, these types of accidents are a result of negligence and not following appropriate health and safety measures, and therefore can be completely avoided.

"We’d always advise employers to make sure their workers are fully up to speed with all health and safety policies, and even regularly test their employees to ensure workplace accidents and injuries are kept to a minimum.”

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