Storm Helene is set to hit the UK on Monday, bringing gale-force winds which have forced the Met Office to issue a yellow weather warning.

Parts of Britain are expected to be battered with winds reaching as high as 65mph as Helene sweeps in from the west.

The Met Office has warned tropical storm Helene will sweep in overnight on Monday, meaning people could be waking up to the after effects which could effect their journey to work on Tuesday.

A yellow weather warning has been put in place between 6pm Monday evening through until 8am the following morning.

It warns that there are some delays to road, rail, air and ferry transport to be expected, and there could be short term losses of power in some areas.

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The areas of most concern are West Wales, Devon, Cornwall, County Down in Ireland and the western coast of North East England.

Met Office forecaster Greg Dewhurst told Metro.co.uk: ‘Starting with Monday, it is going to be a fairly bright start to the week in central parts of  the country, with the northern parts of the country becoming a bit cloudier but it is likely to brighten up.

‘England and Wales will having a dry day with sunny spells but it will start to turn grey and cloudy in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

‘Temperatures on Monday will be in the nice high teens and low twenties, with a max temperature on 26C forecast in London.

‘This will all change overnight on Monday with heavy rain moving into north west wales and this will get pushed across the north sea quite quickly.

‘Gales are expected around the western coasts with 40-50mph gusts expected and these could go up to 65mph.

‘It’s going to be a windy start to Tuesday and we will eventually see further rain coming on into the western parts of the UK.

‘Temperatures will be a little bit down with highs of 24C towards London.

‘Wednesday is likely to remain unsettled and winds will increase, with some gales possible around the hills.’

But it isn’t all bad news.

After our recording-breaking summer temperatures are still a little higher than average, giving us a chance to hold off from the winter wardrobe for a little longer.