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Mafeteng teachers trained to identify gangsterism in school

By ‘Mamohaila Rampo

MASERU

Mafeteng is notoriously known for high crime rates related to gangsterism, thus the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Skillshare together with the National Security Services (NSS) saw it necessary to aid Mafeteng teachers with expertise to identify as well as report gangsterism (Manomoro) related incidents in schools.

This expertise where shared at a three day workshop apprehended not only to train teachers but to inform  people about the NSS by building of public trust and civic confidence in the state’s institutions.

Through the National Security Sector Reforms for Peacebuilding Project (NSSRPP) UNDP Security Sector Reform Expect John Symons said teachers can play an important role in the state’s security framework, adding that the NSS have chosen teachers because of their influence and interaction with troubled youth in a troubled district like Mafeteng.

Symons said the three day workshop will aid teachers to reduce threats to national security, assistance troubled students in schools and, most importantly, facilitate community peace building.

Also the workshop supports the NSSRPP’s outputs related to oversight and enhanced government and state security institutions engagement with society; strengthened internal and public oversight mechanisms; and conflict resolution, negotiation and peacebuilding.

The intelligence, like any other workers should also account for their jobs. Symons said it is necessary for the NSS to work in the shadows and undertake covert activities. But that does not mean they are unaccountable “lone wolves”.

Symons also mentioned that around the world, the public has probably no greater suspicion or lack of understanding of their intelligence service. They know who are they, what their role are and how do they gather “intelligence”, What powers they have, What rights do ordinary people have, Is the intelligence service just here to spy on us? A lack of information and engagement creates mistrust and suspicion. Suspicious people become defensive or even hostile.

The security expect said an outreach like this is so very important to the NSS because transparency helps to dispel rumors and misinformation. He said information exchanges also create a working rapport, rather than an adversarial relationship, between people, organisations and the state.

He said it the right of the people to know about the NSS

“If the intelligence service is funded by the state, from the public‘s taxes, and its goal is to support national security, civilians have a right to know what their role and powers are, and the mechanisms to challenge their actions if necessary because no one is above the law,” said Symons.

Skillshare Project Manager adv. Rapelang Mosai said throughout the investigation intended for the national reforms, it surfaced that people fear gangsterism in schools, he explained from the beginning of the project they capacitated civil servants, then members of the media, now they are ending with teachers because the project will be will be coming to an end in March.

Lesotho’s omnibus bill of proposed constitutional amendments seeks to establish an independent security sector inspectorate, oversight and complaints authority mandated to investigate complaints from members of the public in respect of the conduct of members of the security agencies.

Mafeteng teachers trained to identify gangsterism in school

‘Mamohaila Rampo

MASERU

Mafeteng is notoriously known for high crime rates related to gangsterism, thus the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Skillshare together with the National Security Services (NSS) saw it necessary to aid Mafeteng teachers with expertise to identify as well as report gangsterism (Manomoro) related incidents in schools.

This expertise where shared at a three day workshop apprehended not only to train teachers but to inform  people about the NSS by building of public trust and civic confidence in the state’s institutions.

Through the National Security Sector Reforms for Peacebuilding Project (NSSRPP) UNDP Security Sector Reform Expect John Symons said teachers can play an important role in the state’s security framework, adding that the NSS have chosen teachers because of their influence and interaction with troubled youth in a troubled district like Mafeteng.

Symons said the three day workshop will aid teachers to reduce threats to national security, assistance troubled students in schools and, most importantly, facilitate community peace building.

Also the workshop supports the NSSRPP’s outputs related to oversight and enhanced government and state security institutions engagement with society; strengthened internal and public oversight mechanisms; and conflict resolution, negotiation and peacebuilding.

The intelligence, like any other workers should also account for their jobs. Symons said it is necessary for the NSS to work in the shadows and undertake covert activities. But that does not mean they are unaccountable “lone wolves”.

Symons also mentioned that around the world, the public has probably no greater suspicion or lack of understanding of their intelligence service. They know who are they, what their role are and how do they gather “intelligence”, What powers they have, What rights do ordinary people have, Is the intelligence service just here to spy on us? A lack of information and engagement creates mistrust and suspicion. Suspicious people become defensive or even hostile.

The security expect said an outreach like this is so very important to the NSS because transparency helps to dispel rumors and misinformation. He said information exchanges also create a working rapport, rather than an adversarial relationship, between people, organisations and the state.

He said it the right of the people to know about the NSS

“If the intelligence service is funded by the state, from the public‘s taxes, and its goal is to support national security, civilians have a right to know what their role and powers are, and the mechanisms to challenge their actions if necessary because no one is above the law,” said Symons.

Skillshare Project Manager adv. Rapelang Mosai said throughout the investigation intended for the national reforms, it surfaced that people fear gangsterism in schools, he explained from the beginning of the project they capacitated civil servants, then members of the media, now they are ending with teachers because the project will be will be coming to an end in March.

Lesotho’s omnibus bill of proposed constitutional amendments seeks to establish an independent security sector inspectorate, oversight and complaints authority mandated to investigate complaints from members of the public in respect of the conduct of members of the security agencies.

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