logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
star Bookmark: Tag Tag Tag Tag Tag
Papua New Guinea
An article was changed on the original website An article was changed on the original website An article was changed on the original website

Safety at sea is a no-brainer

THE number of lives lost at sea will continue to increase because of the negligence of small boat owners, operators and passengers.
Time and time again, authorities have called on boat owners, operators and passengers in the maritime provinces to comply with sea safety measures.
One does not need to be a rocket scientist to know the importance of exercising responsibility and complying with sea safety measures like not travelling in bad weather, not overloading, carrying extra fuel, and carrying life jackets and some form of communications device.
Yes, we still have people travelling in overloaded dinghies loaded with building materials, food items, bags of betel nuts and there is no care by boat operators to comply with the safety regulations.
Boat operators should know and respect their load limit, but it seems that many break this simply rule for the sake of a few more kina in the pocket.
The load limit must be enforced by the local authorities to ensure the safety of both the operators and passengers.
Most times people along the coast don’t take heed of weather warnings and venture out during windy conditions thinking that because they are seafarers they can sail through it.
This is the kind of careless attitude that leads to disaster.
For some, years of practice and experience in sea travel have made experts. But there is a downside. As they grow up watching their grandfathers and village elders sail through difficult conditions, their sense of complacency is heightened to the point of recklessness.
Banana boats are not fun to be in when the wind picks up, often with little warning.
People die reasonably frequently in open-sea banana-boat crossings and you will need to exercise common sense before boarding one. Don’t contemplate a trip in rough weather or if the boat is overloaded.
Remember that those boats usually do not carry life jackets or any kind of safety equipment.
The call to respect weather warnings comes as eight people are still missing after their boat capsized.
The government knows how much it costs to conduct search and rescue operations to find people missing at sea, and that is why the National Maritime Safety Authority (NMSA) has been calling on small boat owners and operators to practise sea safety, especially during windy conditions.
But the authority can only do so much. The final decision on whether a boat should go out to sea or not rests entirely with the boat owners and operators.
One reason dinghies capsize at sea is because they often carry outboard engines that are too big.
Dinghies should be in good condition to operate and most dinghies capsize because of overloading or technical problems.
Rules and regulations have been passed and ready to be implemented.
It is just a matter of enforcing it.
There has been too many unnecessary loss of lives at sea.
That needs to stop.

Themes
ICO