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Corbyn says he WON'T back PM's Brexit plan and labels it a 'rehash of the same old deal'

Jeremy Corbyn blasted Theresa May's 'bold' New Deal Brexit as a 'rehash' tonight as her last-gasp attempt to ram an agreement through Parliament looked doomed to failure. 

The opposition leader, who last week broke off talks with the PM's top team after weeks of deadlock, branded it 'effectively a repackaging of the same old bad deal, rejected three times'.

His brutal assessment came as Labour MPs from across the party looked set to condemn the new plan before it even gets put to a vote.   

A host of Jeremy Corbyn's backbenchers said they would not support it even though she made a host of concession designed to woo them into the aye lobby.

 Mr Corbyn said: 'On key elements - customs, market alignment and environmental protections - what the Prime Minister calls her new Brexit deal is effectively a repackaging of the same old bad deal, rejected three times by Parliament.

'We will of course look seriously at the details of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill when it is published. 

'But we won't back a repackaged version of the same old deal - and it's clear that this weak and disintegrating government is unable deliver on its own commitments.'

Mr Corbyn (pictured campaigning in south London today) said Labour 'won't back a repackaged version of the same old deal'.

The Prime Minister dangled a political carrot in the form of a temporary customs union until the next general election in front of Labour MPs today

The Prime Minister dangled a political carrot in the form of a temporary customs union until the next general election, as well as a vote on a referendum in a bid to break the deadlock.

But MailOnline understands she was forced to water down her offer after a Cabinet revolt over the idea of giving MPs a free vote on a referendum - something that would have made it much more likely to pass.

And Labour MPs were not impressed. 

Former minister Dame Margaret Beckett said it was 'no more likely to succeed than her previous attempts'.

The peer said Mrs May was trying to 'spice up the same old deal' without any guarantees of delivery and called for a People's Vote.

She said: 'MPs will be rightly wary of offers from a Prime Minister who is about to resign and will probably be replaced by a hard-line successor.

'It would be very dangerous to vote through a deal to leave the European Union without any clear idea of our eventual destination - a blindfold Brexit that would only prolong uncertainty for families, businesses and Parliament.

'Rejecting this hotchpotch offer will show once and for all there is no stable majority for any form of Brexit without handing the decision back to the people.'

Essex MP Wes Streeting, who backs a second referendum, said: 'Lots of us have been very clear that the PM's deal can pass on the condition that the people get to decide through a referendum. 

'That's not what the PM is promising I'm afraid. Will look at the detail first, but on that basis it's unlikely I'll vote for the Bill at Second Reading.'

His view was echoed by Sefton MP Bill Esterson, who said: 'So, MPs are offered a vote on whether there will be a final say public vote on her deal if we pass her Withdrawal Bill. 

'That's very different to offering a public vote in return for passing her Bill. Struggling to see how the PM has really shifted her position.'

Meanwhile one of Jeremy Corbyn's allies voiced concerns that a second referendum could might lead to a loss of faith in democracy, sparking a 'major crisis'. 

Shadow Cabinet Office minister Jon Trickett signalled that the party might not back a referendum - an issue which has divided the party.

He said: 'Many voters have told me that their faith in politics is already at a low ebb.

'So, there's a risk in the idea of a second referendum because the whole political system could lose the people's consent.

'If that were to happen, the country would be faced with a major crisis.'

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