USA

McEnany calls chants against Trump 'appalling'

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said that protesters’ chants at President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden on Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power: 'What country are we in?' Romney: 'Unthinkable and unacceptable' to not commit to peaceful transition of power Two Louisville police officers shot amid Breonna Taylor grand jury protests MORE when he visited the Supreme Court on Thursday to pay respects Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgHarris faces pivotal moment with Supreme Court battle Club for Growth to spend million in ads for Trump Supreme Court nominee FEC flags McConnell campaign over suspected accounting errors MORE, who died Friday, were “appalling” and “disrespectful.” 

“The chants were appalling but certainly to be expected when you’re in the heart of the swamp,” McEnany told reporters at an afternoon press briefing.

McEnany said that she takes no issue with Americans peacefully demonstrating and chanting at the president, but she described the chants Thursday as a sign of disrespect. 

“Everyone has a First Amendment in this country, but I thought it was an appalling and disrespectful thing to do as the president honored Justice Ginsburg,” McEnany told reporters. 

Trump and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpTrump privately blamed Black Americans for lacking initiative: report Melania Trump: Ginsburg's 'spirit will live on in all she has inspired' MORE visited the Supreme Court Thursday morning to view Ginsburg’s casket, which is being displayed atop the court steps. 

As the two stood silently before the casket, groups of people around the court loudly booed and shouted “vote him out” and “honor her wish” — the latter an apparent reference to Ginsburg reportedly telling her granddaughter that her final wish was for the next president to fill her vacancy. 

Trump is expected to announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday, and Republican senators are making plans to confirm Trump's pick before the election — after they refused to give a hearing to a nominee from President Obama in 2016 for eight months before that year's election. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFEC flags McConnell campaign over suspected accounting errors Poll: 59 percent think president elected in November should name next Supreme Court justice Mark Kelly: Arizona Senate race winner should be sworn in 'promptly' MORE (R-Ky.) argues the situations are different because the Senate is held by a majority of the sitting president's party in this case. 

McEnany separately insisted Thursday that precedent was on the White House’s side, claiming there are  29 previous instances in which a nomination was made in an Election Year. 

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