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South Africa

Would Polokwane’s residents have joined in the 1976 uprisings?

Maxwell Modiba said, "Yes I would have joined in the protest. At the time I can only imagine the only way that we as the youth would have got heard was if we demanded an ear, and the protest was the perfect strategy at the time. It is just unfortunate that lifes were lost in the process, however the motive behind the protest was achieved and it was worth it," he said.

POLOKWANE – Here is what some of them had to say;

Mathari Mamatlaruma said, “For safety measures I don’t think I would have joined in the protest because not everything is achieved or every problem can be solved by fighting fire with fire. I think given the opportunity the problem could have been resolved in other ways and no lifes would have been lost. The day or any other day that the goal set would have been achieved would have still been achieved,” she added.

Mahlatse Maredi said, “I would have joined the movement but not be in the streets. I believe in peaceful protests and anything that may lead to lifes getting lost or even people get hurt I choose not to be part of. Just like the other protests of such magnitude that have taken over the years i.e the Fees Must Fall, I was part of it, but from the safety of my room,” he added.

Bonolo Maphoto said, “Yes, I think I would have joined in the fight for equality in education as I am firm believer in equality in life irrespective of the socio economic status of a person or where they come from or even the color of their skin. I also believe that everyone has a right to have their won opinion and should be allowed to exercise and execute whatever values and beliefs that they believe in as long as it does not endanger or incite harm in the community,” she said.

Diapo Letsoalo also agreed with Maxwell and said he would have joined in the protest because in most instances the youth must retaliate to be heard. “This is still very much even in our homes where youngsters are not heard until they retaliate. So yes I was going to be part of the Soweto uprising protest because I am an advocate for equality in the society,” he added.

Bernard Davids said,”As a young person, I would have joined in the protest, to be part of the change that I would also want to see in my community. I believe that no one has the right to impose or force anything on anyone, no matter what. So joining in the movement would mean that I am fighting for equality and fair treatment to people in every aspect, whether it is in the classrooms, workplace or even in the streets,” he said.

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  AUTHOR

Thabitha Mahlangu

JOURNALIST (JUNIOR)

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