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Holy See

‘Only God Is Master of Life, Our Duty Is to Preserve It Always,’ Vatican Reacts to Vincent Lambert’s Death

“We recall and reiterate what the Holy Father said, intervening on this painful one story: God is the only master of life from the beginning to its natural end and it is our duty to preserve it always and not give in to the culture of waste.”

Alessandro Gisotti, Director of the Holy See Press Office, underscored this in a statement he issued today, July 11, 2019, in response to the death of Vincent Lambert.

“We received the news of Vincent Lambert’s death with pain. We pray that
the Lord welcomes Him into His house and we express closeness to his loved ones and to those, up to the last minute, have been committed to assisting him with love and dedication.”

“We recall and reiterate what the Holy Father said, intervening on this painful one story: God is the only master of life from the beginning to its natural end and it is our duty to preserve it always and not give in to the culture of waste.”

Yesterday, Pope Francis tweeted: “We pray for the sick who are abandoned and left to die. A society is human if it protects life, every life, from its beginning to its natural end, without choosing who is worthy to live or who is not. Doctors should serve life, not take it away.”

Reiterating that withdrawing nutrition and hydration would constitute a grave violation of human dignity, the Vatican noted that while “the “vegetative state” is certainly a burdensome pathological state,” it “however does not in any way compromise the dignity of those people who find themselves in this condition, nor does it compromise their fundamental rights to life and to care, understood as the continuity of basic human assistance.”

Nutrition and hydration, they explained, constitute a form of essential care, “always proportionate to life support.” To nourish a sick person, they continued, “never constitutes a form of unreasonable therapeutic obstinacy, as long as the person is able to receive nutrition and hydration, provided this does not cause intolerable suffering or prove damaging to the patient.”

Abandonment, Pitiless Judgment

“The suspension of such care represents, rather,” they decried, “a form of abandonment of the patient, based on a pitiless judgment of the quality of life, expression of a throwaway culture that selects the most fragile and helpless people, without recognizing their uniqueness and immense value.”

“The continuity of assistance,” they underscored, “is an inescapable duty.”

They expressed their hope “that solutions may be found as soon as possible to protect Mr. Lambert’s life,” and concluded expressing the prayer of the Holy Father and all the Church.

On May 20, Pope Francis tweeted: “We pray for those who live with severe illness. Let us always safeguard life, God’s gift, from its beginning until its natural end. Let us not give in to a throwaway culture.”

***

Joint Declaration of the Dicastery for the Laity, Family and Life and the Pontifical Academy for Life on the case of Mr. Vincent Lambert: In full agreement with the affirmations of the Archbishop of Reims, H.E. Msgr. Éric de Moulins-Beaufort, and the auxiliary bishop, H.E. Msgr. Bruno Feillet, in relation to the sad case of Mr. Vincent Lambert, we wish to reiterate the grave violation of the dignity of the person that the withdrawal of nutrition and hydration would constitute. Indeed, the “vegetative state” is certainly a burdensome pathological state, which however does not in any way compromise the dignity of those people who find themselves in this condition, nor does it compromise their fundamental rights to life and to care, understood as the continuity of basic human assistance.

Nutrition and hydration constitute a form of essential care, always proportionate to life support: to nourish a sick person never constitutes a form of unreasonable therapeutic obstinacy, as long as the person is able to receive nutrition and hydration, provided this does not cause intolerable suffering or prove damaging to the patient.

The suspension of such care represents, rather, a form of abandonment of the patient, based on a pitiless judgment of the quality of life, expression of a throwaway culture that selects the most fragile and helpless people, without recognizing their uniqueness and immense value. The continuity of assistance is an inescapable duty.

We therefore hope that solutions may be found as soon as possible to protect Mr. Lambert’s life. To this end, we assure the prayer of the Holy Father and all the Church.

[Vatican-provided statement]
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