Former Tory prime minister Sir John Major doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Boris Johnson’s brother Jo doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Boris Johnson’s former editor Max Hastings doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Margaret Thatcher’s sometime chancellor of the exchequer, Ken Clarke, doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Winston Churchill’s grandson doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories. Nicholas Soames memorably called him a chancer.

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

He said yesterday: “I’ve known Boris on and off for 25 years, and he is a likeable, ­entertaining personality. Would you ­absolutely trust him? No.”

Ex-home secretary Amber Rudd doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

She provided some of her reasoning in 2016 with the ­memorable and colourful view that he was the “life and soul of the party” but “not the man you want driving you home at the end of the evening”.

Cabinet minister Michael Gove doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

Well, he doesn’t trust Johnson, or didn’t in 2016 when he concluded he wasn’t capable of leading the country.

Current Scottish Tory Leader Jackson Carlaw doesn’t trust Boris ­Johnson’s Tories.

Or, at least, he didn’t until having an incredible Damascene conversion following Johnson’s ­victory in the party’s ­leadership election.

Ex Tory MP Nick Boles doesn’t trust Boris Johnson’s Tories.

He called the PM: “A compulsive liar who has betrayed every single person he has ever had any dealings with – every woman who has ever loved him, every member of his ­family, every friend, every colleague, every employee, every constituent.”

Does the Queen trust Boris Johnson’s Tories? If she does then she shouldn’t.

The Supreme Court upheld a ruling that Johnson had effectively misled the monarch when he advised her to prorogue Parliament.

Not trusted by friends. Not trusted by ­family. Not trusted by current colleagues. Not trusted by former colleagues.

The prospect of this PM, this party of ­government, returning to power with an increased majority is not one which should be relished.

There are flaws with all of the alternatives.

Labour’s ambitious, impressive but at times fanciful manifesto.

The SNP, again under the most impressive leadership but weighed down with a poor record in government at Holyrood.

The Lib Dems with an unsustainable Brexit position but with some fine individuals, ­including Scottish leader Willie Rennie.

The Greens, leading the way on the most important issue of all but struggling to make the great leap forward.

All are preferable to Boris ­Johnson’s Tories.

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