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Brexit latest news – EU warned ‘time is short’ as Barnier remains in London until tomorrow for trade deal talks

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THE EU has been warned "time is short" to secure a Brexit deal as talks continue this week.

EU's Chief Brexit negotiatior Michel Barnier has extended his stay in London to Wednesday amid optimism of a breakthrough.

His British counterparts will then travel to Belgium to continue talks ahead of a mid-November deadline.

It comes as French President Emmanuel Macron has admitted he's playing "the bad cop" but has repeatedly said he'd be prepared to see no trade deal at all than back down on the issue, with Europe minister Clément Beaune adding that said Paris is determined to ensure the EU is “really tough” with Britain.

This puts France at odds not only with nearly every other EU nation, but also with the EU's Chief Brexit negotiatior Michel Barnier stressed the importance of a deal to both sides and ordered the EU to compromise.

The fishing debate appears to be the final sticking point preventing a deal, with Britain suggesting a Norway-style agreement where access to UK waters is renegotiated with the EU on a yearly basis.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • ELECTRIC CARS MORE EXPENSIVE IF A BREXIT DEAL ISN'T REACHED

    Electric vehicles could become £2,800 more expensive on average next year if a Brexit deal is not reached, a trade body has warned.

    A rise would be unavoidable as a result of 10 per cent tariffs being placed on all vehicles imported to the UK from the EU, Mail Online reports.

  • NEW INVESTMENT STRATEGY 'WILL CREATE TENS OF THOUSANDS OF JOBS'

    Trade minister Ivan McKee will set out the plan to the Scottish Parliament on Tuesday afternoon.

    He said: “It aims to create high-value, skilled jobs in growing sectors and attract businesses that share our progressive, outward-looking values.

    “With global economies still being impacted by coronavirus, and the end of the Brexit transition period looming, this plan is designed play an important part in driving Scotland's economic recovery.”

  • FAIR COMPETITION

    The main priority for EU leaders was to ensure fair competition rules, Macron said.

    He added: “And it happens the remaining 27 leaders of the EU, who chose to remain in the EU, are not there simply to make the British prime minister happy.”

  • 'FRENCH FISHERMEN KNOW SITUATION WILL CHANGE'

    French fishermen know they won’t get the same access to British fishing waters after Brexit, President Emmanuel Macron said.

    “Will the situation be the same as today’s? No, that’s for sure. Our fishermen know it, we know it too. We’ll have to help them. But can we accept a Brexit that sacrifices our fishermen? No,” Macron said.

  • OPTIMISM

    EU negotiator Michel Barnier has extended his stay in London to Wednesday amid optimism of a breakthrough.

    His British counterparts will then travel to Belgium to continue talks ahead of a mid-November deadline.

  • HUNDREDS OF FOREIGN CRIMINALS SLIPPED INTO UK

    Hundreds of foreign killers slipped into Britain unhindered in the past three years.

    Many only had their crimes uncovered when arrested for new offences.

    Criminal Records Office checks revealed 802 cases where a suspect had a conviction for murder or manslaughter abroad.

    You can read more here

  • BRITS GOING TO EUROPE FACE QUEUES AT AIRPORTS

    Brits going on holiday to Europe next year face an extra hour in airport queues after eurocrats rejected pleas to grant us access to fast lanes.

    The EU Commission has told Member States visitors from the UK won't be allowed to use passport e-gates from January 1.

    It means we'll have to join long lines with arrivals from the rest of the world including the US and China.

  • FRANCE 'PLAYING THE BAD COP'

    France has admitted it is playing “bad cop” on Brexit as trade talks enter a vital week.

    Europe minister Clément Beaune said Paris is ensuring the EU is “really tough” with Britain.

    He said: “We’ve always been accused of being the bad cops — we take full responsibility for that.”

    More on the story here

  • BARNIER IN LONDON UNTIL WEDNESDAY

    Barnier and his EU team will be in London until Wednesday, after which talks will switch to Brussels and continue through the weekend, an EU spokesperson said.

  • DEVOLUTION SETTLEMENT

    The UK Internal Market Bill disrespects the devolution settlement, a peer has said.

    Welsh Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Humphreys of Llanrwst said: “In Wales, this is seen as an assault on our devolution settlement, heralding the return of direct rule from England.

    “We're faced here with another example, as with the Covid-19 response in England, of Whitehall insisting on managing from the centre rather than understanding and empowering local decision making.

    “The powers of our devolved legislatures and the powers of the regional mayors, although limited, seem to be resented and distrusted by the Government – and the automatic response seems to be to claw back control to the centre.

    “My fear is that this Government's knee-jerk reactions all add to the perception that the Union isn't working for the devolved nations.

    “And as I've said in previous contributions, this is encouraging an increasing percentage of people in Wales to conclude that the future lies in independence.”

  • 'ABSOLUTE LAUGHING STOCK'

    Boris Johnson's Government has become an “absolute laughing stock” given its conduct in relation to the Brexit divorce deal, Labour has claimed.

    Shadow attorney general Lord Falconer of Thoroton said other countries will believe the UK is “not reliable” given it is threatening to override the Withdrawal Agreement signed with the EU.

    Shadow attorney general Lord Falconer of Thoroton said other countries will believe the UK is “not reliable” given it is threatening to override the Withdrawal Agreement signed with the EU.

    “As it happens, you make this Government an absolute laughing stock by the way first of all (Northern Ireland Secretary) Brandon Lewis said they were breaking the agreement, then (former Advocate General for Scotland) Lord Keen of Elie said they weren't breaking the agreement, then Brandon Lewis said again 'oh yes we are', then Lord Keen resigned over what Brandon Lewis said, and then (Cabinet Office minister) Michael Gove says 'maybe we are, maybe we aren't'.”

  • MUCH WORK TO BE DONE

    Boris Johnson's official spokesman said: “We are in now what is an intensive phase of negotiations.

    “I wouldn't wish to pre-empt what's being discussed.

    “It's the first time that we have been negotiating on legal texts and across all areas at the same time and we have welcomed that fact.

    “But there is also much work to be done if we are going to bridge what are the significant gaps that remain between our positions in the most difficult areas and time is very short.”

  • RESPECT THE LAW

    Conservative peer Baroness Altmann called on the Government to confirm that it wishes to maintain the UK's reputation for upholding the rule of law.

    Lady Altmann told peers: “If part five is a negotiating tactic and the Government really does not intend to have to use it and is aiming to get a deal, or if there is no deal, surely we still need to respect the Good Friday Agreement, and our internal market needs to respect the promises made that this Northern Ireland protocol would be part of our future relationship with the EU.”

  • 'GOOD FRIDAY AGREEMENT IS OUR HERITAGE'

    Conservative peer Lord Cormack warned the Government not to put the Good Friday Agreement “at risk”.

    Lord Cormack told peers: “It would be an act of supreme folly if anything we did in this Parliament endangered the continuity of the Good Friday Agreement.

    “It is absolutely crucial that each and every one of us recognises this in whatever party we sit, or on the cross benches.

    “This agreement is our heritage and it is our duty to conserve it.

    “And it is nothing to do with whether you are on the Brexit side or the Remainer side, that argument is over.”

  • WHAT IS A NO DEAL BREXIT?

    A No Deal departure from the European Union means leaving without formal arrangements for the future relationship.

    Britain's trade, customs and immigration rules were tied up with the single market and a host of EU regulatory bodies.

    Mr Johnson had insisted Britain would leave the EU on October 31 “do or die” – and was prepared to leave with no deal.

    The PM said he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than ask the EU for another Brexit extension.

    But a proposed law blocking a No Deal Brexit was backed by MPs on September 4, 2019 and was passed in the Lords on September 6.

    The Benn Act required the Government to either reach a deal – or gain Parliament's approval for a No Deal Brexit by October 19.

    The UK ended up leaving the EU on January 31 with a transition period until December 31 2020.

    While we did leave with a deal – in which this transition period was agreed – there is still the possibility of ending up in a no deal scenario still.

  • BREXIT PARTY WADES INTO FREE SCHOOL MEALS ROW

    The Brexit Party has joined the onslaught of criticism directed at the Government over free school meals.

    The right-wing party, once headed by Nigel Farage who also raised eyebrows last week when he tweeted support for free school meals during the holidays – hit out at No 10 on Twitter.

    In a tweet from the official Brexit Party account, a spokesperson wrote: “The Government was happy to help adults to eat out in August, but now it lets the poorest children go hungry during the school holidays.Does this seem fair to you?”

  • PRICE HIKE ON EU-BUILT ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    Car buyers in the UK could face a hike of £2,800 on EU-built electric vehicles if the UK leaves the transition period without a future trade deal.

    Analysis conducted by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders revealed that the sharp rise in cost could cut demand in electric vehicles by 20 per cent.

    Under a so-called Australian style trading arrangement, tariffs would be imposed – which is estimated to add around £2,000 to the cost of electric vehicles that are built in the UK and exported to the EU.

    Around two-thirds of electric vehicles on sale in the UK are built in factories on the Continent.

  • NO 10: ‘TIME IS SHORT’

    Boris Johnson’s spokesperson said of this week’s talks: “It’s the first time that we have been negotiating on legal texts and across all areas at the same time and we have welcomed that fact.

    “There is also much work to be done if we’re going to bridge what are the significant gaps that remain between our positions in the most difficult areas, and time is very short.”

  • PM DENIES WAITING FOR US ELECTION

    The Prime Minister has denied reports he is waiting to see what happens in the upcoming US election before making a final decision on the Brexit trade agreement.

  • ‘COST OF WEEKLY SHOP TO RISE IF NO-DEAL’

    The cost of a weekly shop is set to rise if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, a business group has warned.

    David Wells, chief executive of Logistics UK, has urged ministers to help reach a deal warning of a rise in the price of your average food shop.

    Writing in the Sunday Times he said: “Everyday household items we import will become more expensive under World Trade Organisation tariffs, some by 30 per cent or more.

    “This will make the household shopping basket much more expensive, particularly in the early part of 2021 when we rely on imports for much of our fresh food.”

  • BORIS HOPES MERKEL CAN ‘UNLOCK’ BREXIT DEAL

    The PM is hoping the German Chancellor can “unlock” a fishing agreement.

    Boris Johnson is keeping his fingers crossed as there still seems to be no movement on fishing rights in Paris.

  • ‘BRITAIN IS WINNING’ AS TORY MP PRAISES JAPAN TRADE DEAL

    A Tory MP has insisted “Britain is winning” as praised a recent trade deal with Japan.

    Richard Holden, MP for northwest Durham said: “By the time of the last election, employment in North West Durham had recovered to around the national average. A significant part of that is down to Nissan and its supply chain in the region.

    “This is why the agreement that Liz Truss has signed with Japan last week provides a very much-needed good news at a very difficult time, particularly for North East England but, more widely, for the whole country.

    “The Japan deal is proof that we can strike good trade deals for Britain, despite the derision of arch-Remainers. Britain is out there and we’re winning.”

  • BRANDON LEWIS: ‘THE EU RECOGNISES IT NEEDS TO MOVE’

    Northern Ireland secretary Brandon Lewis has said he thinks resuming Brexit talks are a sign the EU may recognise it needs to give way.

    He told the BBC's Andrew Marr show: “The fact that Michel Barnier has outlined in the last week or so that they are going to come back and do these intensive negotiations, he recognises the EU do need to move, and that he is staying through to next week, is totally a very good sign.

    “I think there is a good chance that we can get a deal but I think it is for the EU to understand that it is for them to move as well.

    “We have got to make sure that it is a deal that works not just for our partners in Europe — we want to have a very good relationship with them obviously — but one that works for the United Kingdom.

    “I think there is a good chance that we can get a deal but I think it is for the EU to understand that it is for them to move as well.”

  • AMAZON ON BOARD

    Amazon has joined a 'secret' panel who will guide the government on the buying of goods post-Brexit – a move that has been branded 'frightening'.

    A tax expert said Amazon embedding itself into public procurement was a 'cause for concern' after the business was criticised for its tax record.

    Over the past five years, the online giant has been awarded 82 central government contracts worth £225 million, according to The Mirror.

    Amazon bosses attended two meetings last year with Oliver Dowden, who was a Cabinet Office minister at the time.

    TUC boss Frances O’Grady said: “Amazon’s reward for its exploitative business model is a seat at the table on an influential Government board advising on public procurement, on top of the multi-million-pound Government contracts it receives.”

  • LEO VARADKAR: ‘I’M CONFIDENT THERE WILL BE A DEAL’

    Ireland’s deputy PM Leo Varadkar has insisted a deal will be reached between the UK and the EU.

    He said: “I’m confident there will be a deal.”

    But Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis said: “The EU needs to understand it is for them to move as well.”

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