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Great Britain

From Lorraine Kelly to Jeremy Clarkson, Sun columnists reveal their favourite kid’s book as they back our campaign

EVERY week you love reading your favourite Sun columnists. But what were the books they read as a child that inspired them?

Here, our writers, who are backing our drive for schools to register for our brilliant Books For Schools campaign, reveal their own beloved children’s book.

More than 2,000 schools have already registered their interest after we teamed up with publisher HarperCollins to give away up to £12million worth of books to primary schools in England, Wales and Northern Ireland for FREE.

Just make sure you tell your school about our campaign and to register so it can receive a book box from the Collins Big Cat reading scheme, containing 106 terrific titles.

Each primary school has to register then collect 3,500 tokens, which we will start printing this month.

'Teaches kids a valuable lesson'

Jane Moore

IN Frog And Toad Are Friends, the characters are firm friends and engagingly endearing in how they relate to each other.

The stories are charming, funny and sometimes poignant, and they teach children the valuable lessons of the loyalty, support, forgiveness and personal interaction it takes to make a friendship flourish and sustain.

The two characters reflect the strengths and frailties we all have, but best of all, some of the stories are laugh-out-loud funny.

'It would still make me laugh'

Jeremy Clarkson

MY absolute favourite – and the best book ever – is Winnie The Pooh.

Chapter Six, in which Eeyore gets two presents, made me laugh when I was four, it made me laugh when I read it to my children and if I read it now, it would still make me laugh.

It’s said everyone is represented by one of the main characters and I believe that. James May, for instance, is Owl, and Richard Hammond is Piglet.

And I, most definitely, am Tigger, who arrived in Chapter Two of The House At Pooh Corner – the second-best book ever.

'Spurred on to be a journalist'

Lorraine Kelly

MUM and dad taught me to read and write before I went to primary school – the greatest gift they could have given me.

My favourite book growing up was Little Women. I wanted to be Jo and it spurred me on to be a writer and journalist.

I really wanted to pass on my love of reading to my daughter Rosie, and when she was little I dug out my Dr Seuss books and classic fairytales to read to her every night.

We went on to read all the classic children’s books and Harry Potter, of course.

'This vivid tale stood out'

Dan Wootton

WOULD I have my imagination without Roald Dahl? I’d like to think so.

But I’m sure it wouldn’t be as vivid, creative, sublime and ridiculous if my mum hadn’t made his incredible books a staple of my childhood.

But Charlie And The Chocolate Factory always stood out. The best thing about Roald was his ability to teach me about the real world.

And yup, that meant greedy and nasty kids, but he also wanted children to be good and to stand up for themselves.

'It changed my life, I loved it'

Tony Parsons

WHEN I was ten our teacher read our class My Family And Other Animals, and that was when I fell in love with books, with reading and with stories. It changed my life, I loved it so much.

A boy – not so different from me – who went off to live in Corfu with his strange family. The book transported me into the world of the story.

And even now, when I re-read the book, I am stunned at how good it is.

All kids have the capacity to love books, and love reading – adults just have to give them the right books.

'One chapter moved me to tears'

Deidre Sanders

I SIMPLY adore Wind In The Willows and I’ve given my well-thumbed copy to my grandchildren.

It’s a book that grows up with you. When I was under ten, I never read the chapter Piper At The Gates Of Dawn. When I re-read the book aged 13, the chapter moved me to tears.

Little ones identify with Mole and his longing to be home for Christmas. And then there is Toad – silly and vain and ultimately endearing.

We still say, “Poop, poop”, when setting off on an adventure.

'There's nothing to beat it'

Rod Liddle

RABBITS. Lots of rabbits. As a six year old I loved the Brer Rabbit stories. Tales of rabbity mischief by the terribly unfashionable Enid Blyton.

Then, when I was 12, it was Watership Down. As an only child, books were my escape from the boring world.

There is nothing like a good book to grab hold of you, to keep you mesmerised. It’s just you and the author – and that wonderful story he has woven for you.

There is nothing to beat it. Not even Angry Birds or Tik Tok.

Find out more

1. Get your school to register at thesun.co.uk/booksforschools by Friday, November 22, 2019. Only schools can register, so encourage yours to sign up

2. Help your school collect 3,500 tokens from The Sun and The Sun on Sunday between Saturday, November 23, 2019, and Saturday, January 18, 2020

3. Once your school has 3,500 tokens, they will need to return them by Saturday, February 8, 2020

4. Your school will receive the books in March 2020

David Baddiel kick starts The Sun's Books For Schools campaign

GOT a story? RING The Sun on 0207 782 4104 or WHATSAPP on 07423720250 or EMAIL exclusive@the-sun.co.uk

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