Obese Brits will receive the coronavirus vaccine before millions of the nation's elderly, according to new official guidelines.

"At-risk" people aged 18 to 65 considered at-risk are to be vaccinated before those under 65, according to the Government's newly revealed priority list.

Those in the high-risk group include the morbidly obese and people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the latter group tending to be overweight.

Many of the victims of the coronavirus pandemic have been overweight or obese, and fat adults are twice as likely to die of the disease than their thinner contemporaries.

Overweight adults are twice as likely to die of the disease than their thinner contemporaries

Other members of the high-risk group include organ transplant recipients, people undergoing cancer treatment and those with compromised lung function such as severe asthmatics.

The Government has drawn up a priority list based on who suffers the worst outcomes and is at highest risk of death from Covid-19.

Health secretary Matt Hancock has said if the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) approves a vaccine, the roll-out could begin as early as December.

The vaccine roll-out could begin as early as December

He added the Government was working "tirelessly" to be in the "best possible position to deploy a vaccine" as soon as one was approved by the MHRA.

The vaccine will be administered through care homes, GPs and pharmacists, as well as in vaccination centres set up in venues such as sports halls.

The government has warned that the priority list could change substantially if the first available vaccines are not considered suitable for older adults.

The government has warned that the priority list could change substantially

Here's the full priority list to date:

  1. Older adults' resident in a care home and care home workers
  2. All those 80 years of age and over and health and social care workers
  3. All those 75 years of age and over
  4. All those 70 years of age and over
  5. All those 65 years of age and over
  6. High-risk adults under 65 years of age
  7. Moderate-risk adults under 65 years of age
  8. All those 60 years of age and over
  9. All those 55 years of age and over
  10. All those 50 years of age and over
  11. Rest of the population (priority to be determined)
NHS staff could start receiving the vaccine in just 10 days' time

Reports earlier today indicated NHS staff could start receiving the vaccine in just 10 days' time.

NHS England expect to get stocks of vaccines produced by Pfizer/BioNTech on December 7, 8 or 9, the Guardian reports.

Also announced today was the news that the Government has asked the regulator to assess the Oxford/AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine, of which it has pre-ordered 100 million doses.