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Operation Sea Lion dossier reveals how Hitler planned to sweep 600,000 troops from English Channel to London in ‘exceptionally bold’ invasion

TOP secret documents have revealed how Hitler planned to sweep 600,000 trips through the Channel in an 'exceptionally bold' invasion on England.

A copy of the Operation Sea Lion dossier detailing the plan to invade Britain in 1940 is set to be sold at auction next week.

The documents were compiled by British authorities based on documents found in the German naval archives after the Allies captured Berlin to end the war.

The blueprint for Operation Sea Lion, which was to have taken place in September 1940 is said to be similar to Operation Overlord which was the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944.

The dossier details how Nazi planners identified five sectors of the English coast to attack, from Ramsgate in Kent to Selsey Bill in West Sussex.

Dubbed as "exceptionally bold and daring" by British officials, under Operation Sea Lion it was planned to land 100,000 troops, 650 tanks and 4,500 horses in the first wave of the attack on the south east coast from the French ports of  Le Havre, Cherbourg, Boulogne and Ostend.

According to the plans, the troops would have landed between Ramsgate and Deal, Folkestone and Dungeness, Dungeness and Rye, Bexhill-on-Sea and Beachy Head and Brighton to Selsey Bill.

Once a bridgehead had been established, a further 500,000 soldiers would have landed.

According to The Times, the plans outline how confident the Germans were that such an onslaught would have led to the "rapid abandonment" of the British defences south of London as their first objective was to occupy southeast England within two weeks.

It's thought that like the Allied invasion of Normandy, the Germans would have attempted to fool the enemy into believing that the main landings were to take place elsewhere and a diversion attack was planned for two days between Aberdeen and Newcastle before the planned attack on the southeast coast.

Hitler believed that Operation Sea Lion would have led to the rapid conclusion of the war, it's reported in the documents.

But the planned invasion depended on the Luftwaffe gaining air superiority by the middle of September that year but the RAF's victory in the Battle of Britain thwarted the attack.

A limited number of copies of a hardback book, German Plans for the Invasion of England in 1940, were made after the war and given to top British intelligence officials in 1947.

A copy will be auctioned by Henry Aldridge & Son of Devizes, Wiltshire, for £5,000 on Saturday, January 19.

According to the Mail Online, auctioneer Andrew Aldridge said: "This is a fascinating account that was compiled just after the war by the Admiralty and was based on documents taken from German naval archives.

"This is the "what if" scenario and chronicles in great detail the events that ultimately proved to be the cancellation of the invasion of England.

"Operation Sea Lion was postponed until January 1941, again in May 1941 and then shelved indefinitely. These books were only given to a select group of people such as the First Sea Lord and the Lord of the Admiralty at the time."

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