Ozzy Osbourne has spoken out over being diagnosed with Parkinson's battle.

The Black Sabbath rock icon, from Birmingham, broke his silence over the diagnosis during an interview with Good Morning America.

Taking to the show, Ozzy - often referred to as The Prince of Darkness - shared the details alongside wife Sharon Osbourne.

Ozzy admitted the year has been "terribly challenging", after suffering a horror fall in February 2019.

Ozzy said: "(This year) has been terribly challenging for us all."

Sharon, meanwhile, said: "It's Parkin's II, which is a form of Parkinson's.

"There's so many different type of Parkinson's. It's not a death sentence by any stretch of the imagination, but it does affect certain nerves in your body."

Ozzy continued: "I had to have surgery on my neck which screwed all my nerves in.

"I've got numbness down this arm from the surgery. My legs feel going cold, I don't know if that's Parkinson's or what... It's a weird feeling."

The rock icon broke the news during an interview with Good Morning America

Osbourne previously postponed his world tour - including a show in Birmingham - but says he is now on the mend.

Ozzy revealed he is currently taking Parkinson's medication and taking nerve pills.

"I got a numbness down this arm for the surgery, my legs keep going cold," he said.

"I don't know if that's the Parkinson's or what, you know, but that's -- see, that's the problem.

"Because they cut nerves when they did the surgery. I'd never heard of nerve pain, and it's a weird feeling."

"Coming from a working class background, I hate to let people down. I hate to not do my job," said Osbourne.

"And so when I see my wife goin' to work, my kids goin' to work, everybody's doing -- tryin' to be helpful to me, that gets me down because I can't contribute to my family, you know."

"But you know, put it this way -- I'm a lot better now than I was last February. I was in a shocking state."

On why he came clean over his diagnosis, Ozzy said: "I'm no good with secrets. I cannot walk around with it anymore 'cause it's like I'm running out of excuses, you know?"

"The hardest thing is watching somebody that you love suffer," daughter Kelly then said.

"It's kind of become a bit of -- I think a role reversal for us, where we have to be like, 'Snap out of it. Come on we -- we have to all admit what's happening here,' so that we can get over this. And it took a while for everyone to be on the same page."

"We've all learned so much about each other again -- and it's reaffirmed how strong we are," she added.