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Sleepy senators raid chamber ‘candy desk’ with coffee banned as Trump impeachment trial drags on

SENATORS have been struggling to stay awake throughout Donald Trump’s impeachment trial as coffee and food — aside from a beloved "candy desk" — are banned from the chamber.

Lawmakers yesterday attended the first arguments in the historic case against the president and the session ran more than 12 hours, ending near 2am today.

Water and milk are the only liquids allowed inside the chamber, per Senate rules. Without coffee, senators have understandably been struggling to stay alert.

Sen. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., said he’s struggling with the lack of coffee, as he drinks it “from the minute I wake up until bedtime.”

“So my biggest challenge is to drink enough coffee to stay awake, but not drink so much that I, you know, that I’m, ah, uncomfortable in the chamber,” he told The Wall Street Journal.

One senator, Jim Risch, R-Idaho, reportedly fell asleep for about 15 minutes yesterday.

Risch, an ally of Trump, “could be seen from the press gallery motionless” roughly four hours after the proceedings began.

A sketch caught the senator seemingly in the act, as cameras aren’t allowed in the chamber during Trump’s trial.

But despite the liquid caffeine ban, there is a well-stocked “candy desk” that might keep senators staying awake a bit longer.

The candy desk has been run by Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Penn., since 2015.

His staff restocks the desk with candy, which all comes from Pennsylvania and is donated by manufacturers.

A spokesperson for the senator told the New York Post the drawer has a variety of goods, including almond Hershey bars, Rolo caramel candies, Milky Way and 3 Musketeers bars, as well as peanut butter cups and chews.

The candy desk tradition started in 1965 and was used during Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial in 1999, maintained by then-Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Penn.

Donald Trump Impeachment - Latest from Washington as trial against US President begins in Senate

He told The Morning Call he also made sure House Republicans arguing for Clinton’s impeachment had their own candy stash — which he claims made Clinton’s legal team jealous.

Charles Ruff, a member of Clinton’s legal team, questioned if Santorum could be an unbiased juror if he were only providing candy to Republicans.

“So we immediately got candy to the Clinton defenders, and made sure that they were well-stocked for the rest of the trial,” Santorum said.

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