A sequel to last week’s ­electoral tragedy will play out in the Commons.

Instead of a programme for hope and renewal, the Queen will deliver a dismal Boris agenda for the country.

It will be her second Queen’s Speech under Prime Minister Johnson, essentially a re-run of the one from two months ago.

This time it will be driven by the power of what Boris calls a “stonking” majority.

That makes it more significant but no more promising.

Boris has forged a new political landscape in a divided, dysfunctional Britain created by ten years of Tory misrule.

He has won a historic and perplexing victory by persuading voters he is the best person to put right the damage he has been so complicit in wreaking throughout every community in the country.

The size of his majority means Boris has free rein to rule from Downing Street for five years.

He must prove to those who have lent him their votes in Labour heartlands that he means what he says about fairness and support for public services such as the NHS.

With his record of lies and broken promises we can be forgiven for casting large buckets of doubt on his intentions and the outcome.

He needs his feet held firmly to the fire. But with no sign of an early replacement for the crushed Jeremy Corbyn, we don’t yet know who will take on that role in the Commons.

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General election results 2019

As Labour’s Jon Trickett says in the Sunday People today, it is time for politicians to reconnect with the people they are meant to represent.

Trust desperately needs to be restored.

It remains to be seen if Boris is the right man for the job.

Labour’s renewal has to be deep and has a long way to go.

But Boris’s problems are just beginning.