Lesotho
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Help Lesotho’s profound human impact

By: Ts’oloane Mohlomi

Last week, His Majesty the King Letsie III lauded Help Lesotho founder Dr Herbert for her organization’s marvellous works in the country. The King also wished her well in future endeavours and said the impact the organization had in the kingdom has been visible and encouraged those who would take the baton to continue sustain the founders dream.

More than 23 years ago, a University of Ottawa student from Lesotho in her final year, had an informal meeting with her University lecturer Dr Peg Herbert. From the innate details of their conversation little did she know that the meeting between them would transcend into something expansive, which would in turn immensely benefit her home country.

In her conversation with Dr Herbert, Sr Alice Mphatsoe a Roman Catholic nun, who even during her time in Canada wasn’t shy to proclaim her religious confliction, described how she passionately relayed the treacherous conditions that Basotho lived under-the psychological distress that they endured and the many health posed conditions exacerbated by poverty.

During the heartfelt engagement, Dr Herbert, who would later go on to establish Help Lesotho, felt touched by the vivid description of the country, and felt compelled to travel all the way to try and make a difference.

Upon her arrival in Lesotho, she explained that she was met by the very daunting conditions she expected but persevered in her mission.

“As you know, 23 years ago, I learned about Lesotho for the first time from my student at the University of Ottawa. No one could have imagined the results of that meeting. The sisters welcomed me, housed and fed me, trusted me and prayed with and for me. I will forever be grateful; I thank everyone for the love and prayers all these years.

“When I came to Lesotho in 2004, life expectancy was 33. Every element of society was broken by the AIDS pandemic. My heart and life were forever altered-haunted by the notion that so many thousands of children, youth and community members were overwhelmed by grief and loss-feeling alone and frightened.

“Over the years we have grown in leaps and bounds and I remain incredulous that you welcomed me into the bosom of your communities and families, your culture and your challenges. During the course of time we were able to build a tremendously talented well- trained group of professionals delivering impactful programmes which transform lives and also give focus to gender equity as this is an organization led by women,” Dr Herbert said during her recent retirement celebration in Hlotse, Leribe.

 By the end of this year Help Lesotho, would have reached over 300,000 vulnerable people and, produced over 60,000 graduates from their intensive programmes, which cover targeted groups and are inclusive and impactful in areas such as psychological support, providing support to the most vulnerable people including girls, orphans, herd boys, young mothers and the elderly.

Indeed, the non-governmental organization’s main objective is to enforce life skills training and mental health support in rural Lesotho. In addition, within the organizations five-year strategic plan they intend on increasing programming focused on boys and men as they are struggling and also in need.

Mr Mathata Tlhabi, a young male from Phomolong in the remote Thaba-Tseka district, who is an alumni of the institution currently perusing an internship in medicine, on his way to achieving his dream of becoming a medical doctor, expressesd gratitude and said the organization played a significant role in elevating him to such an enviable position.

Help Lesotho’s profound human impact

By: Ts’oloane Mohlomi

Last week, His Majesty the King Letsie III lauded Help Lesotho founder Dr Herbert for her organization’s marvellous works in the country. The King also wished her well in future endeavours and said the impact the organization had in the kingdom has been visible and encouraged those who would take the baton to continue sustain the founders dream.

More than 23 years ago, a University of Ottawa student from Lesotho in her final year, had an informal meeting with her University lecturer Dr Peg Herbert. From the innate details of their conversation little did she know that the meeting between them would transcend into something expansive, which would in turn immensely benefit her home country.

In her conversation with Dr Herbert, Sr Alice Mphatsoe a Roman Catholic nun, who even during her time in Canada wasn’t shy to proclaim her religious confliction, described how she passionately relayed the treacherous conditions that Basotho lived under-the psychological distress that they endured and the many health posed conditions exacerbated by poverty.

During the heartfelt engagement, Dr Herbert, who would later go on to establish Help Lesotho, felt touched by the vivid description of the country, and felt compelled to travel all the way to try and make a difference.

Upon her arrival in Lesotho, she explained that she was met by the very daunting conditions she expected but persevered in her mission.

“As you know, 23 years ago, I learned about Lesotho for the first time from my student at the University of Ottawa. No one could have imagined the results of that meeting. The sisters welcomed me, housed and fed me, trusted me and prayed with and for me. I will forever be grateful; I thank everyone for the love and prayers all these years.

“When I came to Lesotho in 2004, life expectancy was 33. Every element of society was broken by the AIDS pandemic. My heart and life were forever altered-haunted by the notion that so many thousands of children, youth and community members were overwhelmed by grief and loss-feeling alone and frightened.

“Over the years we have grown in leaps and bounds and I remain incredulous that you welcomed me into the bosom of your communities and families, your culture and your challenges. During the course of time we were able to build a tremendously talented well- trained group of professionals delivering impactful programmes which transform lives and also give focus to gender equity as this is an organization led by women,” Dr Herbert said during her recent retirement celebration in Hlotse, Leribe.

 By the end of this year Help Lesotho, would have reached over 300,000 vulnerable people and, produced over 60,000 graduates from their intensive programmes, which cover targeted groups and are inclusive and impactful in areas such as psychological support, providing support to the most vulnerable people including girls, orphans, herd boys, young mothers and the elderly.

Indeed, the non-governmental organization’s main objective is to enforce life skills training and mental health support in rural Lesotho. In addition, within the organizations five-year strategic plan they intend on increasing programming focused on boys and men as they are struggling and also in need.

Mr Mathata Tlhabi, a young male from Phomolong in the remote Thaba-Tseka district, who is an alumni of the institution currently perusing an internship in medicine, on his way to achieving his dream of becoming a medical doctor, expressesd gratitude and said the organization played a significant role in elevating him to such an enviable position.

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