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Teenage lovers from 4,000 years ago buried facing each other in a remarkable grave in Kazakhstan

Teenagers who lived 4,000 years ago have been found buried facing each other in a remarkable grave in Kazakhstan.

The ancient pair are believed to have been aged 16 or 17 when they died and archaeologists say there were likely from a 'noble family' in their culture.

It's not clear whether they were siblings or lovers but the prehistoric pair were buried gazing at each other for their journey to the afterlife.

Experts have yet to work out how they died but there are plans to carry out research on the remains to find out.

Embrace: The teenage pair's remains pictured in an ancient burial complex called Kyzyltau cemetery - in the remote Karaganda region of Kazakhstan

The youngsters were found in an ancient burial complex called Kyzyltau cemetery, which is made up of five hills in the remote Karaganda region.

Gold and bronze treasures were found in their grave and the young woman wore two bracelets on each arm, as well as pendants depicting the sun.

She also wore precious gold temple rings shaped like earrings, say archaeologists.

'The man and the woman are facing each other,' said archaeologist Igor Kukushkin. Most likely, the just-discovered young couple belonged to the noble family.

'The grave is rich. The young woman has two bracelets on each arm with spiral endings, and round solar pendents with ornaments.

'It is significant that was wearing gold temple rings.'

The Bronze Age couple are believed to be aged around 16 or 17, reported Tengrinews.

Face-to-face: The prehistoric duo, who date back more than 4,000 years, were buried gazing at each other for their journey to the afterlife

Rich tomb: Gold and bronze treasures were found in their grave. The young woman wore two bracelets on each arm as well as solar pendants

Nearby was found the grave of a suspected priestess from the ancient Alakul culture.

'This woman was buried with seven pots, ashes and a skull,' said Kukushkin.

'Her grave was not robbed (by later generations), although many neighbouring graves were plundered.

'Perhaps something here scared them away. Seven pots is an unusual number. Most likely she was a priestess.'

Excavating the site: Archeologists have not determined how the young people died but there are plans to carry out research on the remains

Excavation: Archaeological research pictured taking place in the Shetsky District of Kazakhstan, which appears to be a rich site for ancient remains - especially from wealthy families

History: In Soviet times, Karaganda was nicknamed the 'middle of nowhere' and was a destination for political exiles from many parts of the former USSR

WHAT ELSE HAS BEEN FOUND IN THE KARAGANDA REGION?

The Karaganda region of Kazakhstan appears to be rich for excavations. 

The latest finding comes just one year after a 5,000-year-old grave was found in the same region - also containing a couple buried close to the tomb of two horses pulling a Bronze Age 'chariot' into the afterlife.

The prehistoric lovers lie on their sides close to each other, the man armed with a quiver of arrows and a metal dagger.

His partner was wearing jewellery including green bracelets made of semiprecious stones.

The nearby likeness of a chariot pulled by the two harnessed horses - believed to have been sacrificed for the burial - was also the grave of another similar couple, say archaeologists.

Meanwhile, back in August 2015, archaeologists found a previously unknown Egyptian-style pyramid. 

The structure is now substantially in ruins but it is believed that it was a lookalike of the famous Pyramid of Djoser in Egypt, and built around 1,000 years earlier.

The discovery was made by specialists from the Saryarkinsky Archeology Institute in Karaganda under the leadership of Igor Kukushkin. 

In Soviet times, Karaganda was nicknamed the 'middle of nowhere' and was a destination for political exiles from many parts of the former USSR.

Yet the discovery of the pyramid shows that a rich culture thrived here in the deep past

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