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Malaysia

Yoursay: Do we have too many GPs in Malaysia?

YOURSAY | ‘The health minister needs to conduct a study to look into why M’sians are so unhappy with our GPs.’

Medical board defends push to revise GP's consultation fees from 27 years ago

Doc: As a general practitioner (GP), when I treat foreign patients they seem to be very surprised at the affordability, professionalism of the GP, ability of the GP to converse and explain to the patients their issues, the ability to see a GP without an appointment, and a one-stop clinic to seek consultation and get medication.

I read articles that Malaysia has one of the best professional and affordable healthcare system in this region, and hence our ‘Malaysia My Second Home’ is doing so well attracting foreigners to retire in Malaysia. The private hospitals are booming due to medical tourism.

But when it comes to our Malaysian people, there are always complaints, especially on social media, about poor treatment given by GPs. GPs charging a lot; expensive medication; long wait at clinics or GPs not spending enough time with patients; GP clinics not open after midnight; GPs not smiling; etc.

The health minister needs to conduct a study to look into why Malaysians are so unhappy with GPs, and the issues that make GPs one of the most despised group of professionals in Malaysia.

Anonymous_1540348819: Nobody owes you your health or their services. If you don't feel the GP's fees are fair, then go to a general hospital.

If you don't want to wait, if you want first-class service but want it all to be cheap – that's the pinnacle of entitlement. Let me ask you: what job would you do for just RM20?

Doctors also have families to feed. They are not slaves to the public.

The medical profession is highly regulated, with costs going up every year, yet doctors have not been allowed to raise their charges in 27 years. 27 years! That's almost three decades.

How much has the cost of food, transport, education, housing, etc, gone up in 27 years?

TangoBug: The GPs should come together and form a united front. And work to rule: 9am to 5pm, close for lunch. Stop 16-24 hour clinics. This will clearly show whether or not GPs provide a service of value.

The public will not be in want for emergencies or urgent consultation because the 24-hour service of hospitals is readily available.

Otherwise, the GPs should request for another “town hall” meeting.

Anonymous_d9ebfdab: Hairdressers' fees are much higher compared to GPs. It is based on market forces and yet they are thriving.

The high regulation of GPs breeds a lot of inefficiencies and hidden costs, benefiting a few but taxing many. Drugs are one of the main costs driving up the cost of a visit to a GP, not their consultation fees.

Appum: Visiting a GP nowadays costs between RM80 and RM150 a visit, including medicine, some of which is basic generic medicine. Some more upmarket GPs located in high-end locations charge more.

Maybe it's time we separated consultation from medicine. Let the GP prescribes and the patient buys his or her medicine from a pharmacy. This method is practised in the West.

NNFC: What is the point of scheduled fees when nobody follows them, and basically charge what they want?

Mano: Third-party administrators (TPA) are bodies squeezing massive profits for themselves at the expense of GPs and patients; the government ‘buat tak tahu’ (pretend they don’t know). Even healthcare for Socso staff, which was self-managed, has been given to TPAs.

It's a creative way to add padding for different layers of people to make money, never mind at whose expense.

Mindef wants MACC probe into helicopter purchase, non-delivery

Dont Just Talk: Another RM112.5 million gone. It looks so easy to become a millionaire under a kleptocratic Umno government headed by ‘MaluApa Bossku’. While ‘MaluApa’ stole billions, his ‘dedak’ followers stole hundreds of millions.

Had Pakatan Harapan failed to win the GE14 on May 9 last year, Malaysia would be bankrupt like Venezuela and Zimbabwe.

P Pillai: Malaysiakini should have a section called ‘Daily Corruption News’. There seem to be daily disclosures of the government being robbed by certain individuals.

In the case of the undelivered helicopters, I wonder why TUDM (Royal Malaysian Air Force) kept silent when the first shipment didn't arrive as scheduled. MACC must also probe TUDM. I am sure many parties had a part in this (now common) robbery.

Clever Voter: The previous regime is well known for cheating in anything from screwdrivers to submarines.

One cannot put the blame on past ministers alone. Try top civil servants, including those from the high ranks of the armed forces.

Najib Abdul Razak was the boss of the Defence Ministry (Mindef). He may not be involved in the missing helicopters, but probably laid the seeds of corruption.

Annonnymous 080: Who pays for undelivered goods? And why the need for a Malaysian middleman when McDouglas will give a discount for direct purchases?

Anonymous_435551439668541: Indeed, why on earth does Mindef ever need to appoint an agency as a go-between to purchase military equipment?

Are those agencies, like the one belonging to Abdul Razak Baginda (in the Scorpene submarine purchase) more knowledgeable about military equipment then Mindef personnel?

Mushiro: This is treason to the country. The armed forces are expected to defend the country, but proper equipment and tools are not given.

Anon: Yes, treason! But they always shout “Untuk bangsa, agama dan negara” (for race, religion and country).

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